Resources

Scholarly | Videos/Documentaries | Organizations

Scholarly

Bell, Myrtle P., Mary E. McLaughlin, and Jennifer M. Sequeira. “Discrimination, Harassment, and the Glass Ceiling: Women Executives as Change Agents.”Journal of Business Ethics 37.1 (2002): 65-76. JSTOR. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

This study focuses on the relationship between discrimination, harassment and the glass ceilings, and recommends how women executives can eventually decrease this injustices in the work place.  The study illustrates how many of the factors hindering women from high ranking positions are the same factors that foster sexual harassment.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Bendl, Regine, and Angelika Schmidt. “From ‘Glass Ceilings’ to ‘Firewalls’— Different Metaphors for Describing Discrimination.” Gender, Work & Organization 17.5 (2012): 612-34. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

This piece analyzes the metaphorical framework using the 1980s phrase “glass ceilings” to describe the phenomenon of discrimination in the work place.  The authors suggest the term “firewalls” for contemporary economic and social context due to the metaphor’s permeability, fluidity, and heterogeneity.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Burgess, Zena, and Phyllis Tharenou. “Women Board Directors: Characteristics of the Few.” Journal of Business Ethics 37.1 (2002): 39-49. JSTOR. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

This article summarizes the status of the too few women on serving on boards of directors due to the phenomenon known as the “glass ceiling”. The authors describe the importance of females on director boards and explain the actions women can take to contribute to higher representation of females on corporate boards.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

The Challenge to Act: How Progressive Women Activists Reframe American Democracy. Rep. N.p.: Institute for Women’s Policy Research, 2008.Contemporary Women’s Issues. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

This report analyzes 120 in-depth interviews of American woman ranging from different ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds. All of the progressive women possess leadership roles whether it is in a grassroots organization or in Congress, and share common values of community, family, equality, power, compassion, balance, and practice.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Chubb, Catherine, Simone Melis, Louisa Potter, and Raymond Storry. The Global Gender Pay Gap. Rep. International Trade Union Confederation, Feb. 2008. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

This ITUC Report reviews some of the staggering facts about the status of gender inequality in the workforce, such as the deficit that exists with companies who fail to disclose income information. Furthermore, the report states while globalization narrows the pay gap with international competition, this derives from men’s downward pressure on income rather than a focus on increased income for women.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Elvira, Marta M. “Not Just a Formality: Pay System Formalization and Sex-Related Earnings Effects.” Organization Science 13.6 (2002): 601-17. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

This article explores a study conducted in 2002 regarding the disproportionate relationship between women and earnings compared to males. After interviewing over 8,000 employees, researchers found that compensation gaps most dramatically widen during the time employees are given incentive bonuses.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Johnson, Jenna. “One Year Out of College, Women Already Paid Less Than Men, Report Finds.” The Washington Post. N.p., 23 Oct. 2012. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

This article shares the findings of a report, conducted by the American Association of University Women, that describe that women entering the workforce, who often graduate with higher GPAs, are worth less than equally educated men. According to the report, men and women who graduate with the same major and enter the same industry on average make 82% of what their male colleagues are paid.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Machold, Silke, Pervaiz K. Ahmed, and Stuart S. Farquhar. “Corporate Governance and Ethics: A Feminist Perspective.” Journal of Business Ethics 81.3 (2008): 665-78. JSTOR. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

The authors of this article compare male and female models of corporate governance. While most literature on corporate governance implicitly or explicitly suggest masculine models that focus on conflicts of interest and competitiveness, the authors of this article argue for a model based off of feminist ethics, primarily focused on ethics of care.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

McGuire, Krista L., Richard B. Primack, and Elizabeth C. Losos. “Dramatic Improvements and Persistent Challenges for Women Ecologists.” BioScience 62.2 (2012): 189-96. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

This longitudinal study compares a survey from 1988 to 2012 researching the change over time of women scientists compared to their male counterparts.  While over time the study found less gender bias, the authors suggest that women today still leave the field of science more than men and have lower salaries, promotion rates, and productivity that men.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Pai, Kalpana, and Sameer Vaidya. “Glass Ceiling: Role of Women in Corporate World.” Competitiveness Review 19.2 (2009): 106-13. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

Researchers conducted a study of 257 corporations to analyze the glass ceiling effect in Texas.  The study revealed that only 2 corporations had women chief executive officers, or .78% of the sample.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Paxton, Molly, Carrie Figdor, and Valerie Tiberius. “Quantifying the Gender Gap: An Empirical Study of the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy.” Hypatia27.4 (2012): 949-57. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

The motivation behind this study was to analyze the gender disparity in the field of philosophy in undergraduate or graduate environments and faculty.  The study found that the biggest drop in women occurred between those in introductory philosophy courses and those enrolled by the major, but was mitigated by the presence of female philosophy faculty.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Terjesen, Siri, and Val Singh. “Female Presence on Corporate Boards: A Multi-Country Study of Environmental Context.” Journal of Business Ethics 83.1 (2008): 55-63. JSTOR. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

After conducting studies in 43 countries, researchers attributed social, political and economic structures to influence to female representation on corporate boards. The findings from this study concluded that more countries with more female representation on corporate boards had more females in senior management roles and more equal ratios of male and female pay.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

“When Women Blow The Whistle.” Herizons 26.3 (2013): n. pag. Contemporary Women’s Issues. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.

According to this Canadian study, researchers found that women tend to be whistleblowers (those who report wrongdoing in the workplace) more often than men because they feel an intrinsic duty to do so. Men reported that they would be more likely to whistleblow in return for monetary reward, but experts believe as women become more accepted in the workplace, the proportion of men and women who whistleblow will become more equal.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Williams, Joan C. “The Marissa Mayer Rules.” Newsweek 160.6 (2012): 10. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

This article focuses on female discrimination of those with children in the work place and hi-lights Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer as the one exception with her un-conventional maternity leave.  The articles discusses that 79 percent of women with children are less likely to be hired than those without children – the author argues this discrimination doesn’t apply to Marissa Mayer, who in 2012 made $59 million.

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Zuk, Marlene, and Sheila O’Rourke. “Is Biology Just Another Pink-Collar Profession?”Chronicle of Higher Education 59.10 (2012): 20-21. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

Despite the fact that more women hold biology degrees than men according to this article, women hold less professorship or postdoctorate positions than men in the science.  The article attributes this to women leaving the field to start a family, or refusing science jobs due to the employment constraints of their (most often) science-employed partner.

Videos/Documentariesmakers screenshot

glass_borderpiece_shoes

Organizations

Flickr User mirimcfly via CC License

Flickr User mirimcfly via CC License